A Helper Function for Admin Notices We can make it easy on ourselves by writing a helper function for admin notices.

If you’re in the business of building plugins, or even themes for that matter, and are incorporating object-oriented practices into your work then you’re likely faced with serialization of some type. And one of the aspects of serialization that it requires some type of feedback for the user.

This can be a success message, a failure message, or a message simply warning the user that some went wrong or perhaps something should be updated.

Whatever the case, WordPress provides all of the facilities that we need; however, we can make it even easier on ourselves by writing a helper function for admin notices. It’s simple, too.

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Discounted Memberships: Black Friday Thru Cyber Monday A quick rundown of what comes with a membership to this site and how to get it with a discount.

As with many other blogs, shops, products, and services during this time of year, I’m offering discounted memberships on this blog from Black Friday thru Cyber Monday.

Discounted Memberships: 2018

What does this really get you, though?

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Happy Thanksgiving I dig this time of year and all that comes with it.

As is the same with every single year (well, save for last year when I forgot to write a post – or simply neglected to do so 🤷🏻‍♂️), we’re celebrating Thanksgiving in the United States.

I dig this time of year and continue to do so the more our family grows, and the more time we’re able to spend together.

Happy Thanksgiving 2018

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WordPress Widgets: Starting with Standards One of the best ways to go about object-oriented programming is starting with standards and having tools to enforce them.

The purpose of this series is to start doing a deeper dive into working with object-oriented programming in the context of WordPress.

And since the WordPress Widgets API is one of the APIs that does use object-oriented practices, it’s a logical place to start. Further, it will give us some foundational techniques that we can use to apply to future work as we see how to build more object-oriented projects on WordPress in future series.

So far, we’ve covered the following:

  1. WordPress Widgets: An Object-Oriented Approach. The Widgets API provides a solid litmus test and example of how to get started with object-oriented programming in WordPress.
  2. WordPress Widgets: How to Detect Object-Oriented Programming. The goal is to arm you with everything you need to detect object-oriented practices.

If you’re not caught up, now’s a great time to do so. And if you have, then you’ll recall from the last post, we ended with the following note:

That is, we’ll revisit the WordPress Widget Boilerplate and I’m going to be refactoring it in its current state to adopt more modern PHP standards.

To begin updating the WordPress Widget Boilerplate to follow said standards, we need to do a few things:

  1. create a branch from the existing boilerplate,
  2. install code quality tools,
  3. ensure our IDE is properly set up,
  4. and begin refactoring the code to said standards.

And that’s what we’re going to start doing with this post.

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Simply Refactoring WordPress-Based Code When it comes to refactoring WordPress-based code, what does that look like?

Back in 2011, I was doing a lot of reading on working with legacy code, code quality, and refactoring.

Refactoring WordPress-Based Code

There’s a quote by Martin Fowler (who literally wrote the book on refactoring) attributed to Uncle Bob that’s stuck with me – and I’m sure many, many programmers – ever since:

always leave the code behind in a better state than you found it

The thing about this particular idea is that I think it might sound a bit more idealistic until you really start to try to practice it in everything that you do.

That is, if you take it at face value it sounds like anytime you need to work on a codebase, then you need to leave the entire codebase better than when you found it. But the more I’ve tried to apply this rule in my day-to-day work, the more practical, the cleaner, and the more maintainable WordPress-specific code has become.

So when it comes to refactoring WordPress-based code, what does that look like?

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