WordPress Widgets: Refactoring, Part 8 We'll start breaking apart the various components that go into making up WordPress widgets starting with the administrative area.

When it comes to refactoring the WordPress Widget Boilerplate, we’ve done a lot of work to bring the code base up to more object-oriented standard. Further, we’ve introduced a variety of other tools that allow us to bring our code up to more modern standards

Now that we’ve spent time doing that, it’s time to jump back into the code and begin refactoring it in such a way that allows for the use of abstract classes and subscribers (that work as part of the event-driven design pattern).

At the end of the previous post, I wrote:

In the upcoming posts, we’re going to look at how we can implement subscribers for the public-facing side of the site (that is, where the widget content is displayed). And we’ll do the same for the administration area of the site.

So in this post, we’re going to do exactly that. Specifically, we’re going to start with working on a subscriber for the widget and then getting the base widget to display on the administrative side of the site first.

Continue readingWordPress Widgets: Refactoring, Part 8 We’ll start breaking apart the various components that go into making up WordPress widgets starting with the administrative area.

WP Square One – About Pressware and Me I had the opportunity to appear on WP Square One and shared much about my experience in WordPress and Pressware.

Last summer, I had the opportunity to join Micah Wood and Aaron Reimann’s podcast, WP Square One.

WP Square One Podcast

It’s been a little while before I’ve had the opportunity to share the content of the interview as we waited for publication and transcription, but I’m happy to be able to do so finally.

This particular podcast was one in which we had a lot of fun but also talked about some more serious topics as it relates to business and WordPress.

Continue readingWP Square One – About Pressware and Me I had the opportunity to appear on WP Square One and shared much about my experience in WordPress and Pressware.

Episode 1 – Turn up the Signal Here are the show notes for the first episode of a Practical WordPress Development podcast.

finally published the first episode of the podcast. I’ve opted to title it a Practical WordPress Development Podcast.

Practical WordPress Development Podcast

The premise is simple:

It’s a podcast in which I answer listener questions and talk about the various aspects of being a self-employed developer working with WordPress.

Depending on when you read this, the show may or may not be available on your favorite service (but it’s coming!). In the meantime, you can check it out on Anchor.

All of the notes and the content for the show are covered later in the article.

Continue readingEpisode 1 – Turn up the Signal Here are the show notes for the first episode of a Practical WordPress Development podcast.

Successful WordPress Freelancing By Andy Adams If you’re looking to build a stable & happy freelance business, WordPress is an excellent place to start.

For those of you who have been reading this blog for some time (and by some time, I mean years), then you’ve likely heard me mention Andy Adams.

I’ve talked about him in the previous posts:

Though we don’t work professionally together anymore, we’ve kept in touch, and I’m incredibly proud to share that he’s just released a book: Successful WordPress Freelancing.

Continue readingSuccessful WordPress Freelancing By Andy Adams If you’re looking to build a stable & happy freelance business, WordPress is an excellent place to start.

WordPress Widgets: Refactoring, Part 7 The problem with WP_Widget is that it's a lot of work for a single class to do.

In the last few posts, we’ve done a lot of work to bring the code up to the point of refactoring that’s going to be covered in this article.

Specifically, we’ve covered:

All of these are going to play a role in what we’re going to do today.

Continue readingWordPress Widgets: Refactoring, Part 7 The problem with WP_Widget is that it’s a lot of work for a single class to do.