Software, Development, and WordPress

Category: Articles (Page 1 of 234)

Personal opinions and how-to’s that I’ve written both here and as contributions to other blogs.

Add a Custom View to the All Posts Screen

TL;DR: I’m going to be working on a series that looks how to achieve a useful task with taxonomies, likely categories, then refector it into an object-oriented plugin that will serve as a utility plugin for taxonomies, in general.


A Brief History of OOP Posts

Some time ago, I did a lengthy series about the principles of object-oriented programming (and tried to share an amount as to how to achieve certain things within the context of WordPress).

I’ve also written a bunch of articles about the whole paradigm over the years for those who are interested in catching up on some of those articles.

And I’d be remised if I didn’t share that a good friend of mine has literally written a book on the topic, too.

And thus, as I’ve been thinking about various topics to write about (after taking an admittedly longer period time off than I planned), though that it might be worth talking about practical things we can do with normal APIs and hooks and then refactor that into a type of utility plugin.

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It’s Okay to Write a Kludge, Sometimes

TL;DR: Don’t avoid writing a kludge of code when the situation necessitates it. Sometimes, factors outside of our control dictate how quickly we can turn a solution around. At the minimum, leave a code comment that explains what the code does and optionally why it’s not included in a way that’s as consistent with the rest of the module in which you’re working.


When I first started in my career (as I imagine most people in our industry do), I was bent on writing the best solutions possible to the problems that I was given.

Nevermind that fact that I may not have had the experience of my peers, managers, or so on. I was bent on making sure that given the level of information I had, I was going to write the best code possible and aim to both prove myself but to show what I was capable of doing.

I was young. 🤷🏻‍♂️

Fast-forward over a decade, and things have changed.

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Learn JavaScript, Forget PHP?

The landscape of WordPress has changed.

time lapse photography of green field and clouds

A few years ago, we were all tasked with learning JavaScript deeply and rightly so. With the advent of Gutenberg and projects like Calypso, it’s obvious that JavaScript is becoming a dominant force in WordPress (not to mention the web as a whole), if you don’t consider it to be so already.

And for anyone who has read Coding Horror within the last decade or so, you’re likely familiar with Atwood’s Law:

any application that can be written in JavaScript, will eventually be written in JavaScript.

Jeff Atwood

But as this has happened, it seems as if its created a clearer divide between what constitutes a front-end developer and a back-end developer in the WordPress economy.

Personally, I welcome it as I find myself even more eager to learn, grow, and work on the back-end as PHP grows and changes. But that’s just me and there’s more to examine.

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How To Change Local By Flywheel PHP Settings

If you’re using Local by Flywheel to work on your projects, there may be times where you need to make customizations to the PHP configuration when the site starts.

Before getting started, note the following:

  1. At a high-level, Local will start a containerized environment,
  2. A containerized environment will have its own set of configuration every single time it starts
  3. This means that you cannot change any configuration to the OS-level installation to achieve the changes you need.

So what do we do?

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Resolving PHP and PHP CodeSniffer Errors

macOS is still shipping with PHP (though how this looks for future versions of the OS is likely going to change in some way.).

Anyway, imagine you’re in a situation where you’re working on a project that requires three different components:

  1. PHP,
  2. A set of coding standards,
  3. PHP CodeSniffer that work with said coding standards,
  4. The inability to properly see results of sniffing the code either in your terminal or your IDE.

When this happens, this is almost always a result of a version of PHP, the version of the various dependencies, and making sure they all play well together.

In short, it’s about making sure the tools like PHP CodeSniffer work well with the same version of PHP you have installed. And in this case, the latest and greatest isn’t necessarily the best course of action.

It is, however, close. And in the following steps, you should be able to get everything working exactly as needed for your specific set up.

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