Software, Development, and WordPress

Category: Resources (Page 1 of 57)

A summary of useful links, applications, and tools that I find around the Internet.

Dracula Pro For Optimizing Optimizing Dark Mode

A few months ago, I reluctantly started to try out using the dark theme that comes with macOS and iOS. I’d already been using a similar theme in my IDE and my terminal, so why not take the plunge for the whole experience across the OS?

Like anything new, it took some getting used to but it’s definitely grown on me up to the point where I spent time looking for something that would allow me to really tweak the tools I used the most to make sure that I’m actually enjoying the day-to-day work that I do.

And that’s where Dracula, hat tip to my colleague Mike England, really got the ball rolling for me.

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Discover Object-Oriented Programming Using WordPress

If you’ve read this blog for any length of time, specifically in the last two or three years, then you know I’m a fan of object-oriented programming especially so in the context of WordPress.

And if you’ve followed me on Twitter, you know that – like many of you – I’ve met many people who I consider to be legitimate friends (versus the bastardization of the phrase by sites such as Facebook)

On top of that, you know one of my favorite past times on Twitter is trolling said friends. So far, though, this entire post is all about my friends and me and, ahem, trolling.

So what’s the point?

Ultimately, it’s to give you a heads up something that’s been released today, that’s been a long time in the making, that’s finally available, and that’s going to help anyone who wants to be a better WordPress developer.

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How to Set a Goal, Part 2: We’re Writing Code

In the first post in this [two-part] series, I talked about the idea of what it means to set a goal. Specifically, I said it was more nuanced than just setting a goal and aiming for it. Instead, I said I thought of doing this:

  1. set a goal,
  2. make a plan.

And, if you read the first, you know that I gave an example outside of programming (because I tend to do that sometimes).

But why not also look at what this would look like regarding programming? I mean, the whole point of the site is to talk about how to handle WordPress development from a practical perspective.

And this seems like something that intersects with that whole idea, right?

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How to Set a Goal, Part 1: We’re Not Writing Code

I’ve talked about productivity and similar resources various times, though sparingly, since writing consistently for the past eight or so years this October (can’t believe it’s been that long).

Though I try to stay true to the whole slogan that I pronounce (that is, Practical WordPress Development), there are times that I like to share things that I think can’t help those involved in the industry that is tangentially related to software or web development.

Writing

And in this case, that’s what this post is about; however, I’m going to try to break it into two short reads. In short, the purpose of this is what it means to set a goal, how to go about achieving it, and how to do so both regarding working on self-employment, fitness, or otherwise, as well as how it relates to side-projects (and specifically programming).

I’ll start with the former, first.

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WordPress-Related Resources: Staying Up to Date

Arguably, the single constant that exists in our industry is that we always have to keep learning. I consider that a good thing (who doesn’t?), though I know it also becomes a bit tedious (and even lead to burnout depending on the nature of your job).

And I’d say that’s true now more than ever, especially given the speed at which languages and related tools are moving.

But if you’re working in the world of WordPress and you’re looking to stay up to date with some of the technologies that are used to build products on top of it, I thought I’d share a list of some things I recommend checking out.

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