Using Direct Database Queries to Quickly Update Data, Part 2 Using object-oriented principles to improve on class design for writing database queries to quickly update data.

This is the second, and final part, in a series about – as the title suggests – direct database queries. Specifically, it’s about changing post statuses (but it’s relevant to more than that).

Photo by Ross Findon on Unsplash

From the previous post:

This is yet another post that’s going to be an illustration of how to use $wpdb to quickly update information based on metadata.

And the code provided in that post works but if you’re looking to make it more object-oriented, then there’s more work that can be done.

Before jumping into the actual post, though, it’s important to note that when it comes to object-oriented programming, there’s a lot of work that can go into the class design and creating levels of abstraction.

At some point, you have to draw the proverbial line between when you’re going to use interfaces, how granular your classes are going to be in terms of what they are abstracting, and the like.

And the purpose of this post is to help provide a better object-oriented design but it’s not an exercise is making this as optimal as possible. I do discuss topics like this in another series of posts.

But keep that in mind when reading through the code throughout the rest of the post.

Continue readingUsing Direct Database Queries to Quickly Update Data, Part 2 Using object-oriented principles to improve on class design for writing database queries to quickly update data.

Privacy is Hard: File Syncing What about those on the other side of the service who work at the company responsible for storing the files?

When we’re working on a variety of devices – be it our computers, our tablets, or even our phones – it’s definitely convenient to have access to certain types wherever we are, right?

And with files aside, our phones have such powerful cameras now; it’s nice also to have the ability to store our photos but also to free up space on our phones (although this may be a tertiary issue for you regarding file syncing).

Anyway, there are a lot of services that are available that allow you to store your files in the cloud and to access them anywhere. It’s easy to tout security and privacy and, yes, we can do things on our end like enable two-factor authentication.

But what about the actual files themselves? That is, we can make it more difficult to log in and access the files but what about those on the other side who work at the company responsible for storing the files?

Continue readingPrivacy is Hard: File Syncing What about those on the other side of the service who work at the company responsible for storing the files?

Using Direct Database Queries to Quickly Update Data, Part 1 This is yet another post that's going to be an illustration of how to use $wpdb to quickly update information based on metadata.

This is not the first time I’ve mentioned this, but one of the challenges that come with talking about writing direct database queries to update information in the WordPress database is that you leave yourself open to something like:

Yeah, but there’s an API to do something just like that.

And, in many cases, that’s right. I’m a big fan of using ’em, too. But there are times where direct, parameterized database queries can be a more optimal choice.

Direct Database Queries, Part 1
No, it’s not a database but wouldn’t it be awesome if they looked like this? Photo by Tobias Fischer on Unsplash

This is, of course, contingent on the environment in which you’re working the requirements of your project.

So this is yet another post that’s going to be an illustration of how to use $wpdb to quickly update information based on metadata (without using something like WP_Query or WP_Meta_Query to handle it).

Continue readingUsing Direct Database Queries to Quickly Update Data, Part 1 This is yet another post that’s going to be an illustration of how to use $wpdb to quickly update information based on metadata.

WordCamp Atlanta 2019: Web Apps with WordPress An explanation for why WordPress is a great option for a web application foundation.

I’ve enjoyed speaking at WordCamps since my first back in 2013. You can see a short list of the ones at which I’ve spoken here:

And this weekend is officially WordCamp Atlanta 2019.

WordCamp Atlanta 2019: Web Apps with WordPress

I took 2018 off of speaking for several different reasons, and I’m not planning to do much in 2019 (especially with another kid making her debut later this year ❤️).

But given the work I’ve been doing with WordPress over the past few years, it seemed fitting to apply to at least speak at my local WordCamp.

Continue readingWordCamp Atlanta 2019: Web Apps with WordPress An explanation for why WordPress is a great option for a web application foundation.

Using cURL to Determine If the Specified URL Is a Valid Page Another useful feature of cURL: Determining if the specified URL takes you to a valid page.

Earlier this month, I wrote about finding the destination of a redirect using cURL in PHP. This can be a useful function to use whenever:

  • you know the URLs with which you’re dealing are going to redirect,
  • you know that the number of redirects will be limited to one.

Granted, in the latter case, it’s becoming more difficult because sites like, say, Twitter, have multiple redirects before you get to the destination.

But that’s a topic for another post (unless you just want to implement a recursive or iterative way of working through requests until you find the final destination).

Anyway, there’s another thing that can also be useful whenever you’re working with redirects and with cURL, and that’s determining if the specified URL takes you to a valid page.

Continue readingUsing cURL to Determine If the Specified URL Is a Valid Page Another useful feature of cURL: Determining if the specified URL takes you to a valid page.