What Content is Next for Site Members?

When I set out to create a members-only section of my website, it was to do two things:

  1. provide members with access to high-quality articles for how to approach object-oriented programming in WordPress,
  2. grants discounts to other products and services that I found useful via friends, acquaintances and other services.

Periodically, I do get questions about the content that I’ve produced thus far. If you’re interested in reading the full, detailed list, you can see them here.

Content for Site Members: Members Only Content

But the gist of what I have so far is here:

And that’s the content that I have for site members thus far. But that doesn’t answer the question of what’s next (nor does it answer the question as to why I’ve laid things out the way that I have), so I thought I’d take a post to do that.

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An Object-Oriented Way of Working with Models and Web Applications

When we talk about the concept of Models in object-oriented programming, we’re usually referring to a class that is a representation of the data stored in the database.

That is is, when information is stored in rows and columns, we populate a class, its attributes, and so on with that information so that we’re able to pass it around the application, manipulate it as needed, and then possibly serialize the data back to the database.

But in a web application, it’s fair to assume that the model might need to be possible to the front-end to be used. That is, imagine a front-end request making a call to the server, requesting a model (or a collection of models), and then rendering them on the front-end.

Though this particular post isn’t code-oriented, I still think it’s worth thinking through the process of translating a model from the server and then rendering it on the front-end of the web application.

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Does WordPress Hold You Back as a Developer, Really?

One of the commentaries that we often read or hear about WordPress is its “low barrier to entry” and why this is good for the web.

The counterpoint to this is that it prevents developers (or “would-be developers,” as some may say) from embracing more modern technologies because WordPress doesn’t require them.

Does WordPress Hold You Back?

To be honest, I’ve even seen some go as far as to say that if someone says they are a PHP developer who has primarily worked in WordPress for their career, then you should subtract, say, three years from their “real” PHP experience.

Yikes.

I see reasons for this – I’m guilty of some of the “older” practices – but does that mean that WordPress prevents us from becoming high-quality, object-oriented programmers?

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