Modern Software Engineering in WordPress (We Were on a Break)

Over the past few years, I’ve spent a significant amount of time writing about a lot of things on how to achieve certain things in WordPress. And I don’t regret it (after all, it’s my career and it’s even the subtitle and focus of this blog).

But one of the things that I’ve opted to neglect is a focus more on topics that interest me such as object-oriented analysis, programming, design, and implementation. (And, of course, doing so within the context of WordPress.)

And sure, there are some articles where I’ve touched on it but I recently took a week off of pretty much everything except my [growing] family and during that time, I took stock of a variety of things.

One of those things included this particular site, its content, and the general focus of my career.

Software Engineering in WordPress

For anyone who’s read various articles on this site for an amount of time, you know that I enjoy working with modern PHP, various libraries that are available, incorporating Composer into my workflow, and then bringing this into WordPress development.

But there are also other topics that I’m interested in discussing, like design patterns, in a more WordPress-agnostic aspect. (And then, of course, showing how it can be used within WordPress).

I attribute this to some of the discussions I’ve had with fellow engineers on my team and I really appreciate the push to talk about these things.

So why not blog about them? These include things like:

  • Services,
  • Registries,
  • Repositories,
  • Factories,
  • Decorators,
  • And much more.

For anyone who’s done any object-oriented design or even any reading, much of the above shouldn’t sound unfamiliar. It’s not new territory. It is, however, easier to talk about and to write than it is to implement.

So I’m going to try to start a focus on talking about those topics as well as their implementation in coming articles.

There are also other things with which I’m finally getting to work with such as React as it relates to WordPress. It’s slow going, but going nonetheless.

So for whatever it’s worth:

  1. The blog is alive and well (we were on a break!),
  2. I had a bit of a crisis in terms of what to write about that required some time away,
  3. And I have ideas on things I’d like to cover as my career, the people with whom I work, and the types of things we’re building continue to challenge me.

I look forward to covering this material and getting feedback from the rest of you, too.