Privacy is Hard: Web Browsing with 1Blocker

When it comes to privacy and web browsing, I’ve talked Firefox in a previous post. In the same post, I also stated:

I’m actually a fan of Safari for casually browsing the web. That browser coupled with 1Blocker makes it a solid alternative.

As far as Firefox is concerned, I still think it’s a fantastic browser but if you’re looking for a seamless experience between macOS and iOS 1Blocker alternative solution that I’ve been using for a few weeks.

The motivation for privacy (which I’ve previously shared) still stands but it may not be the same for you. I’m approaching it with the following attitude:

  • what I’m comfortable with using may not be the same for you (and vice versa),
  • and privacy and security are not terms that I use interchangeably.

That said, the rationale for using software like this alongside a browser that’s bundled with an operating system (remember when that was a big deal?) rather than a third-party browser is different.

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A Short-Guide to Changing Valet’s Top-Level Domain

For years, developers have used the dev top-level domain as a way to work with local development versions of their projects.

But Google changed all of that last year.

If you’re interested in reading a bit more into this, check out the post by Justin from WebDevStudios does a good job of going into some of the details (as does this post via Daryl Koopersmith – previously working on WordPress, now working at Medium).

But for this post, I’m trying to keep it short and pragmatic. So, the former is this:

If you’re using HTTPS and a dev domain on your local machine, it’s likely going to stop working. Yes, you can add an exception with some browsers, but not all.

Changing Valet's Top-Level Domain: Firefox Security Exception

If you’ve read this blog for any particular length of time, then you know that I’m a fan of using Valet as part of my local development environment. Part of doing that means that I also secure the local sites to simulate, as much as possible, but staging and production are going to be like.

By default, Valet uses dev as it’s top-level domain, so how do we change that? Luckily, it’s pretty easy.

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How To Export Trello Board Members

For a couple of projects on which I work, I use Trello almost daily.

Export Trello Board Members

Some people find it the end-all, be-all of project management. I can’t say I agree with that statement, but it definitely helps streamline certain workflows (as far as I’m concerned).

But there’s one complaint that I have regarding the application: There’s no way to export the actual list of members for a given board (at least not at the time of this writing). Sure, you can export a board, but what happens when you want to contact all of the users?

There’s no way to export the actual list of members for a given board (at least not at the time of this writing). Sure, you can export a board, but what happens when you want to contact all of the users?

Sure, you can export a board, but what happens when you want to contact all of the users? I mean, I have a list of the users and their email addresses in a separate database, but Trello doesn’t allow me to export that data.

To export Trello board members, I put together a quick script that can run in the console of Chrome (maybe others, but I didn’t test). At the very least, it will return the names of the member so you can find them in your database, assuming you have one.

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Displaying Custom Messages in WordPress, Part 2

In the previous post, I started walking through what we need to do to display custom messages in WordPress. This is specifically in the case of when we are opting to use something other than the Settings API.

Custom Messages in WordPress

In the previous post, I covered the following:

  • Looking at what happens when you use a safe redirect via one of the available WordPress functions,
  • Serializing custom error messages
  • Saving them to the database

To follow-up with what was previously covered, I’ll show how to render these messages – regardless of if they are error messages, notices, or success messages – on the administration page.

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