Software, Development, and WordPress

Tag: Ray in WordPress (Page 1 of 2)

Using Ray in WordPress Development: An Example of Classic Debugging

TL;DR: This final article will demonstrate how to use Ray in WordPress as an example of classic debugging.

No, it’s not the same as something such as Xdebug, but it demonstrates what we can do such as changing variables on the fly and changing the course of execution.


⚠️ If you’ve not already set up your environment, please read this post and make sure you have the free version of Ray installed.

Continue reading

Using Ray in WordPress Development: Measuring Performance

TL;DR: Ray makes it easy to start measuring performance of your code both in WordPress and in standalone PHP solutions.

I don’t know if this is something that’s common within WordPress development, but if you’re working on functionality that deals with a lot of files, a batch of operations, or both, then this is something that may be useful.


⚠️ If you’ve not already set up your environment, please read this post and make sure you have the free version of Ray installed.

Continue reading

Using Ray in WordPress Development: Rendering Data and Data Structures

TL;DR: We’ll see what Ray looks like when rendering data, data structures, and other information in the context of a custom WordPress plugin. We’ll also see how to leverage some of its built in functionality for making data structures much more readable from how we’ve historically been able to do so.


📝 A Note About the Ray Plugin

When it comes to actually using the Ray application within the context of WordPress, I’d like to bring some clarity to the different ways in which it can be installed.

  1. Ray can be installed as a Composer dependency which is what we did in the previous article.
  2. Ray can be be installed a plugin via the WordPress Plugin Repository.
  3. Ray can be installed as a must-use plugin by cloning the repository from GitHub, placing it into your mu-plugins directory and then updating environmental variables as per the documentation.

All of these are viable options. I prefer to use the first option because I’m a fan of Composer and managing my dependencies that way so this guide will be following that approach.

If you opt to use any of the approaches, great! This series, however, will not offer guidance on those methods.


⚠️ If you’ve not already set up your environment, please read the previous post and make sure you have the free version of Ray installed.

Continue reading
« Older posts

© 2022 Tom McFarlin

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑