WordPress and Developer Maturity

One of the things that we often hear about WordPress is that it has a low-barrier to entry for those who are interested in programming and/or for those who are interested in applying what they’ve learned about computer science or software development.

Generally speaking, I have a hard time saying that out loud. I’ll talk about this in more detail momentarily, but suffice it to say that I’m suspect of saying that.

Barreir

Don’t get me wrong: There are some nice things about working with WordPress that are easier than working in other environments, but that’s all assuming you’ve worked in other environments before.

Secondly, I think it’s important to also know where you fall on the spectrum of developer maturity (that isn’t a real thing, so don’t bother googling it, but I’m using it for the sake of this post :). This has always been a fun topic to talk about, but Matt Briggs of Google recently wrote an article that did a great job articulating this.

I highly recommend reading it before continuing with this post, though I’ll be quoting a few parts of it.

WordPress (And Its Low Barrier)

As mentioned earlier in the article, I said that I often times have a hard time telling other programmers – especially new ones – that WordPress is a good place to start because of it’s low-barrier to entry.

Perhaps I’m doing a terrible job of explaining it, or maybe I go on for too long (I’ve been that sometimes I’m too concise and sometimes I ramble so maybe I don’t even know how to communicate :shrugs:).

Starting with WordPress

Anyway, here’s why I think telling those interested in programming that WordPress is a great place to start is a hard sell:

During the course of our conversation, I always end up telling people that they’ll need to know HTML, CSS (perhaps Sass), maybe some JavaScript (and it may require some knowledge of jQuery and/or Backbone), and definitely some PHP.

It's not that easy to get started.

That’s a lot of stuff for a low-barrier to entry, isn’t it? This doesn’t even hit on the topics of open-source licensing, versions of PHP (and features of the various versions), themes, plugins, the differences thereof, and so on, and so on.

I know, I know: Many of those topics, you could argue, are for those who get more advanced in WordPress, but if they aren’t aware of them early on, they may end up creating more problems for themselves had they just had someone to educate them along the way.

The WordPress Development Environment

No matter how you spin it, you’re going to have to get your hands really dirty just to get something up and running on a local machine – a web server (that isn’t always Apache), a database, and the WordPress software.

And should they use an all-in-one solution like XAMPP, MAMP, or WAMP, or should they install each piece of software individually? If they’re interested in building themes and/or plugins, there’s Subversion-based source control that you have to use as well as some of the tooling that’s required to submit things to either repository for WordPress.org.

For those who are able to make it through that, there’s also the topic of getting started with contributing to WordPress core and that’s an exercise in and of itself as it requires becoming familiar with the various Make blogs, Trac, discussions, Slack, patches, and so on and so on.

If you’ve made it this far and you’re a little nervous or anxious about starting with WordPress, then you’re likely a junior developer – and that’s not a bad thing (some associate junior with negativity and that’s a shame).

If you’re someone who reads and thinks that it doesn’t sound terribly daunting and you could tackle it, then maybe you’re more of an intermediate developer.

A Real Programmer

And if you’re someone who reads this and believes that bringing people up to speed on WordPress does require a bit more work and that it doesn’t have such a low-barrier to entry, then maybe you’re an intermediate developer or maybe you’re a senior developer.

And that’s exactly what Briggs talks about in his post.

The Spectrum of Developer Maturity

Again, this phrase isn’t a thing. It’s just something that’s being used in this post to cover junior, intermediate, and senior developers (and everything in between).

A good junior developer can be given a known task, and be expected to execute it quickly, and well.

A good intermediate developer needs less supervision. They can be trusted to raise issues of code design, and play a valuable role in design discussions. They are also the “workhorses” of the dev team. However, further mentoring and higher level supervision is still vital.

A senior developer understands that you cannot do everything yourself, and that their primary role is to help their team get better, in many of the same ways they themselves strive for personal improvement.

There are so many good things in the article it’d be easy to quote the whole thing. But no.

Anyway.

It can be difficult to determine what type of developer you are. Some will have a level of intuition as to where they are, some will overestimate their skills, and some will underestimate their skills (though this is not the post to talk about the science of all of that).

There are a lot of great things to take away from the post, but – with respect to WordPress and getting more people involved in the project on whatever level – it’s important to understand where we fall in terms of our experience and maturity and where those fall who are trying to get into the project.

If someone is looking for somewhere to start in WordPress and they’ve never really gotten involved in programming before, then they’d obviously be defined as a junior developer so they’d need someone with a more experience than them to help bring them up to speed.

If, on the other hand, this is not the person’s first time working with a programming project, then they may still be a junior developer or they may be teetering on the edge of being an intermediate developer.

If someone is looking to contribute to WordPress core, make the overall development process of WordPress easier, contribute something significantly more advanced to the entire economy around WordPress, or something more, then they may be a more mature intermediate developer or perhaps a senior developer.

Finally, if someone is looking to help speed up the process of the next set of people who will be working on WordPress, then they’re likely a senior developer.

And, as with most things, there’s a flip side to this: If you’re somewhere along this spectrum but you’re not where you want to be, then you need to know at least two things:

  1. Where you currently stand with respect to your development experience
  2. Who is available or worth reading and/or following with respect to advanced WordPress development

Nothing here is groundbreaking, is it? I mean, I’d like to think it’s all common sense.

Know Where You Are (Make Things Better)

So what’s the point of all of this?

The point is that we all fall somewhere along this spectrum. Some are happy to stay where we are or get better at our own pace, and some are extremely eager to learn and apply as much as we can.

Similarly, there are some who are eager to bring others along and provide some type of leadership or some type of mentorship, and there are those that aren’t. To that end, I think it’s important for those who are looking to help other people share as much information as they can about the topic – be it blog posts, tweets, repositories, talks, etc.

Ultimately, if you’re looking to up your skill or you’re looking to up the quality of tools and software being built around your WordPress, then it’s important we know where we fall with respect to our experience, and seek out people to help or seek out those willing to help.

9 Replies to “WordPress and Developer Maturity”

  1. Hi Tom

    I think that is pretty much spot on. As someone who has been in this game for about 20 years I think it is definitely about finding solutions to problems and those solutions change on at least a yearly basis if not more often.

    And then you have to think of the best of those solutions (as there is always more that one) you can apply to solve the problem!!! It’s as much art as science.

    1. Thanks for the comment — I almost did’t bother publishing because I wasn’t sure if it’d really resonate with anyone, but I’ve been in the field professionally for about half as long as you. I’ve done both closed source and open source.

      There are definitely a lot of things in Briggs’ post that I think are so well articulated and I wanted to try to verbalize them in the context of WordPress because the developer world is so diverse, you know?

      Anyway, to your point:

      > And then you have to think of the best of those solutions (as there is always more that one) you can apply to solve the problem!!! It’s as much art as science.

      You’re right – and that’s something that I think comes with time: There’s *no* silver bullet solution in programming. At least not most of the time.
      There are just degrees of correctness that we have, and there’s some relief in hearing that (and some frustration also, I think :).

      Anyway, nice to hear of others’ thoughts on the topic as I always like reading others perspectives no matter how similar or different.

  2. Regarding “becoming familiar with the various Make blogs, Trac, discussions, Slack, patches”. Yes, WordPress.org does poor job explaining these topic to newbies. Signed up for slack few months back but they user friendliness is just horrible, I closed the tab and never signed in.

    I have one question, How can you tell/gauge your “current stand” with respect to your development experience ? Suppose someone made few themes in local development, what would be their stand ?

    By they way that stackoverflow meme cracked me up.

    1. This is a really good question, Ashiquzzaman.

      >

      *Signed up for slack few months back but they user friendliness is just horrible, I closed the tab and never signed in.*

      I’m really sorry to hear that. Know that the community at large isn’t all like that – try not to let those who mistreated you be representative of all of us :).

      I wish I had a straightforward answer for you, but I don’t – it’s one of those things that can’t actually be summed up in terms of you’re either a junior, intermediate, or senior developer.

      Instead, I envision those as being points on a line and there are spaces in between each point to which we all belong. With that said, Matt Briggs gives some good definitions as to what each of the developers types are in his article.

      I think the traits of the senior developer is what we should all aspire to be like, but I think that – above that – we can look at the traits he describes and look at what describes you the best. In some places, you may be more advanced than in others – and that’s fine – but it’s the goal of constantly wanting to get better than we should be pursuing.

      Anyway, to be more specific:

      >

      *Suppose someone made few themes in local development, what would be their stand ?*

      *I would ask that to see if they’d use certain plugins like Theme Check, Log Deprecated Notices, and so on in order to make sure that it’s up to speed with the WordPress coding standards.*

      *On top of that, I’ll also see about having someone do a theme audit (like Justin Tadlock) to make sure it’s up to standards, as well. I’d make sure the JavaScript is properly linted, the CSS is well organized (and possibly that it’s using Sass, though not required).*

      *And I’d make sure that all of the PHP code is written up to the standards set forth in the WordPress Coding Standard handbook.*

      I hope this helps!

      On Mon, Jul 6, 2015 at 3:09 PM, Ashiquzzaman Kiron < hello@email.gopostmatic.com> wrote:

      > Tom McFarlin >
      > Ashiquzzaman Kiron added a comment in reply to WordPress and Developer > Maturity < https://tommcfarlin.com/wordpress-and-developer-maturity/>.
      > Ashiquzzaman Kiron <
      http://wpplugindirectory.org> >
      > Regarding “becoming familiar with the various Make blogs, Trac, > discussions, Slack, patches”. Yes, WordPress.org does poor job explaining > these topic to newbies. Signed up for slack few months back but they user > friendliness is just horrible, I closed the tab and never signed in.
      >
      > I have one question, How can you tell/gauge your “current stand” with > respect to your development experience ? Suppose someone made few themes in > local development, what would be their stand ?
      >
      > By they way that stackoverflow meme cracked me up.
      > Reply to this email to reply to Ashiquzzaman Kiron.
      > *Please note*: Your reply will be published publicly and immediately on WordPress > and Developer Maturity > <
      https://tommcfarlin.com/wordpress-and-developer-maturity/>.
      > Recently in this conversation…
      > Andrew Fielden <
      http://andrew.ahead4.biz> > July 6, 2015 at 11:31 am >
      > *Hi Tom I think that is pretty much spot on. As someone who has been in > this game for about 20 years I think it is definitely about finding > solutions to problems and those solutions change on at least a yearly basis > if not more often. And then you have to think of the best of those > solutions (as there is always more that one) you can apply to solve the > problem!!! It’s as much art as science. * > Ashiquzzaman Kiron <
      http://wpplugindirectory.org> > July 6, 2015 at 3:06 pm >
      > *Regarding “becoming familiar with the various Make blogs, Trac, > discussions, Slack, patches”. Yes, WordPress.org does poor job explaining > these topic to newbies. Signed up for slack few months back but they user > friendliness is just horrible, I closed the tab and never signed in. I have > one question, How can you tell/gauge your “current stand” with respect to > your development experience ? Suppose someone made few themes in local > development, what would be their stand ? By they way that stackoverflow > meme cracked me up. * > Reply to this email to reply to Ashiquzzaman Kiron.
      > *Please note*: Your reply will be published publicly and immediately on WordPress > and Developer Maturity > <
      https://tommcfarlin.com/wordpress-and-developer-maturity/>.
      > Want to leave this conversation?
      >
      > To no longer receive other comments on this thread reply with the word > ‘unsubscribe’.
      >
      > Sent from Tom McFarlin <
      https://tommcfarlin.com>. Delivered by Postmatic > < https://gopostmatic.com/?utm_source=footer&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=pluginfooter>.
      >
      >

    1. WordPress is in number in Most dreaded list, that’s something new.

      I think it depends on how long you’ve been around WordPress or even Stack Overflow. Personally, I don’t find it very new mainly because I’ve always heard developers complaining out it (even from the days when SO started).

      It’s unique, though, because it’s often compared to frameworks and languages when, as far as I’m concerned, it’s an extensible application.

      Either way, no big deal. It is how it is and no programming community is without it’s faults. If you look up anything about, say, PHP and “The League” then you’ll see more of the same kind of stuff. Same goes in looking for GitHub issues for frameworks like Angular or something similar.

      I don’t know if that justifies anything or makes it better, but it does show that WordPress isn’t unique in that regard.

      1. Couldn’t agree with you more Tom, I particularly like the description of WordPress as an extensible application. I have been giving this quite some thought over the last day and would like to offer some extended suggestions.

        This is something that I have come across all the time I have been associated with programming. Way back in the day I can remember C++ programmers looking down on BASIC programmers who looked down on any form of other scripting programmers.

        Roll forward 25 years and this is the same thing re-packaged, so a Java programmer looks down on a Ruby programmer looks down on a WordPress developer.

        Within a competitive development community an elitism builds around the various tools that are available at the time so that the more complex and hence more difficult skill to acquire is valued more highly.

        Ultimately though this is the perspective of a developer rather than of a manager or an organization that wants a site or app or whatever done as quickly and efficiently as possible for the best price. So I would suggest that with this in mind WordPress is doing rather well and is doing so due to it’s low barrier to entry vs the ability to create something useful.

        I do wonder though how long WordPress can continue in it’s current format. You mentioned in the post the various things that a developer will need to know to become proficient in WordPress. Since it’s birth WordPress has been evolving alongside an online environment that has seen massive change in the way that new things are built. As a result it feels like it may be a bit cumbersome right now.

        I also feel that WordPress has arrived at a point where there is a fundamental conflict in what it is trying to achieve. Is it a simple to use and theme publishing system or is it the extensible application you described it as?

        As I said before a business will want to get it’s online presence as quickly and efficiently as possible. As for a business owning it’s own site, what does that actually mean? For years now the servers your site runs on are very unlikely to be owned by you, so what difference does it make if the application software is not your responsibility either? In fact it is probably a benefit, then all you are responsible for is a bit of customization and adding content.

        This is the challenge for WordPress and I believe that some of the current moves in the core development are as a response to the competition that sites such as squarespace and shopify are posing.

        Unfortunately this is at odds with the extensible application paradigm.

        So here is an idea….

        WordPress is a way of doing things it is not a technology. Despite the ideal of maintaining backwards compatibility this is not sustainable in the long run, in fact it has effectively been abandoned since themes now have to use the customizer otherwise they can’t be admitted, this is hardly being backwards compatible.

        We already know that the customizer is browser oriented with javascript, in fact it looks remarkably like the way you customize a squarespace site.

        So maybe the way for WordPress to regain some of it’s lower barrier to entry is to do the same thing as it did years ago except this time with Javascript as the weapon of choice talking to the REST API instead of PHP talking to WP Query et al..

        That way a developer will be using and learning one language. A language that he almost has to use for any sort of interactive web page anyway. If a set of functions can be made available to the dev just like the PHP ones then you have created a really easy to use system.

        Whilst this is not WordPress as we know it today it is a possibility that this is on the cards anyway. In the last 6 months I have heard and seen indications from Automattic of node.js being in the mix at some point – this is hardly php. If this is correct then it is moving all towards a Javascript environment.

        If this does happen then the extensible app is really on the cards since all the extensions would be client side and you could really knock your socks off without threat to the server and other sites hosted.

        Just a thought mind…

        1. > This is something that I have come across all the time I have been associated with programming. Way back in the day I can remember C++ programmers looking down on BASIC programmers who looked down on any form of other scripting programmers.

          > Roll forward 25 years and this is the same thing re-packaged, so a Java programmer looks down on a Ruby programmer looks down on a WordPress developer.

          Yeah – this is one of those things that I think is just pervasive in the development community for whatever reason. Maybe it’s human nature and it’s in other industries as well (I wouldn’t know :), but I got started programming in Visual Basic when I was really young and when I started talking to other programmers who were a little older (by just a few years) and who had experience with languages like C++, there was this immediate air of arrogance.

          Yikes. Talk about a turn off.

          Never want to make someone else feel that way. That’s why I don’t care if you’re an Assembly programmer, C programmer, PHP programmer, .NET programmer, Ruby programmer, whatever. You write code. That’s enough for me.

          > Within a competitive development community an elitism builds around the various tools that are available at the time so that the more complex and hence more difficult skill to acquire is valued more highly.

          Bingo.

          > Ultimately though this is the perspective of a developer rather than of a manager or an organization that wants a site or app or whatever done as quickly and efficiently as possible for the best price. So I would suggest that with this in mind WordPress is doing rather well and is doing so due to it’s low barrier to entry vs the ability to create something useful.

          This is true. But for highly complex implementations of a solution, it’s still subject to many of the same rules / laws of software development, IMHO. Not saying *you’re* arguing that, but some would.

          > I do wonder though how long WordPress can continue in it’s current format. You mentioned in the post the various things that a developer will need to know to become proficient in WordPress. Since it’s birth WordPress has been evolving alongside an online environment that has seen massive change in the way that new things are built. As a result it feels like it may be a bit cumbersome right now.

          Cumbersome, maybe. I dunno – I usually just strip away the parts I don’t need (well, at least via filters) – and implement the solution as needed.
          For a lot of things, there’s a pretty set process for doing so. For others, there’s still an approach that has to be created, but that’s the nature of what we do.

          > I also feel that WordPress has arrived at a point where there is a fundamental conflict in what it is trying to achieve. Is it a simple to use and theme publishing system or is it the extensible application you described it as?

          I still view it as the latter, but that’s because of my programming disposition. At least, for now.

          > WordPress is a way of doing things it is not a technology. Despite the ideal of maintaining backwards compatibility this is not sustainable in the long run, in fact it has effectively been abandoned since themes now have to use the customizer otherwise they can’t be admitted, this is hardly being backwards compatible.

          I’m not sure if it’s sustainable or not. I mean, in the long run it might be depending on how long it really is. Operating Systems do the same thing and we’ve seen them around for decades.

          Maybe that’s not a fair comparison, though. I dunno.

          Regardless, the Customizer talk – I know what you’re saying – I’m just opting to stay out of the debate. For now :). I don’t even know if I have a strong opinion on it, to be honest.

          > So maybe the way for WordPress to regain some of it’s lower barrier to entry is to do the same thing as it did years ago except this time with Javascript as the weapon of choice talking to the REST API instead of PHP talking to WP Query et al..

          I wonder if it’ll head in this direction over the next few years. That’d be interesting.

          > That way a developer will be using and learning one language. A language that he almost has to use for any sort of interactive web page anyway. If a set of functions can be made available to the dev just like the PHP ones then you have created a really easy to use system.

          Agreed.

          > Whilst this is not WordPress as we know it today it is a possibility that this is on the cards anyway. In the last 6 months I have heard and seen indications from Automattic of node.js being in the mix at some point – this is hardly php. If this is correct then it is moving all towards a Javascript environment.

          JavaScript is the assembly of the web :). [Atwood’s Law]( http://blog.codinghorror.com/the-principle-of-least-power/).

          > If this does happen then the extensible app is really on the cards since all the extensions would be client side and you could really knock your socks off without threat to the server and other sites hosted.

          > Just a thought mind…

          And good thoughts, indeed.

          On Tue, Jul 7, 2015 at 11:45 AM, shrewsburyprop wrote:

          > Tom McFarlin >
          > shrewsburyprop replied to your comment on WordPress and Developer Maturity > < https://tommcfarlin.com/wordpress-and-developer-maturity/>: > shrewsburyprop < http://andrew.ahead4.biz> >
          > Couldn’t agree with you more Tom, I particularly like the description of > WordPress as an extensible application. I have been giving this quite some > thought over the last day and would like to offer some extended suggestions.
          >
          > This is something that I have come across all the time I have been > associated with programming. Way back in the day I can remember C++ > programmers looking down on BASIC programmers who looked down on any form > of other scripting programmers.
          >
          > Roll forward 25 years and this is the same thing re-packaged, so a Java > programmer looks down on a Ruby programmer looks down on a WordPress > developer.
          >
          > Within a competitive development community an elitism builds around the > various tools that are available at the time so that the more complex and > hence more difficult skill to acquire is valued more highly.
          >
          > Ultimately though this is the perspective of a developer rather than of a > manager or an organization that wants a site or app or whatever done as > quickly and efficiently as possible for the best price. So I would suggest > that with this in mind WordPress is doing rather well and is doing so due > to it’s low barrier to entry vs the ability to create something useful.
          >
          > I do wonder though how long WordPress can continue in it’s current format.
          > You mentioned in the post the various things that a developer will need to > know to become proficient in WordPress. Since it’s birth WordPress has been > evolving alongside an online environment that has seen massive change in > the way that new things are built. As a result it feels like it may be a > bit cumbersome right now.
          >
          > I also feel that WordPress has arrived at a point where there is a > fundamental conflict in what it is trying to achieve. Is it a simple to use > and theme publishing system or is it the extensible application you > described it as?
          >
          > As I said before a business will want to get it’s online presence as > quickly and efficiently as possible. As for a business owning it’s own > site, what does that actually mean? For years now the servers your site > runs on are very unlikely to be owned by you, so what difference does it > make if the application software is not your responsibility either? In fact > it is probably a benefit, then all you are responsible for is a bit of > customization and adding content.
          >
          > This is the challenge for WordPress and I believe that some of the current > moves in the core development are as a response to the competition that > sites such as squarespace and shopify are posing.
          >
          > Unfortunately this is at odds with the extensible application paradigm.
          >
          > So here is an idea….
          >
          > WordPress is a way of doing things it is not a technology. Despite the > ideal of maintaining backwards compatibility this is not sustainable in the > long run, in fact it has effectively been abandoned since themes now have > to use the customizer otherwise they can’t be admitted, this is hardly > being backwards compatible.
          >
          > We already know that the customizer is browser oriented with javascript, > in fact it looks remarkably like the way you customize a squarespace site.
          >
          > So maybe the way for WordPress to regain some of it’s lower barrier to > entry is to do the same thing as it did years ago except this time with > Javascript as the weapon of choice talking to the REST API instead of PHP > talking to WP Query et al..
          >
          > That way a developer will be using and learning one language. A language > that he almost has to use for any sort of interactive web page anyway. If a > set of functions can be made available to the dev just like the PHP ones > then you have created a really easy to use system.
          >
          > Whilst this is not WordPress as we know it today it is a possibility that > this is on the cards anyway. In the last 6 months I have heard and seen > indications from Automattic of node.js being in the mix at some point – > this is hardly php. If this is correct then it is moving all towards a > Javascript environment.
          >
          > If this does happen then the extensible app is really on the cards since > all the extensions would be client side and you could really knock your > socks off without threat to the server and other sites hosted.
          >
          > Just a thought mind…
          > Reply to this email to reply to shrewsburyprop.
          > Here’s a recap of this post and conversation: >
          > WordPress and Developer Maturity > <
          https://tommcfarlin.com/wordpress-and-developer-maturity/> was published > on July 6, 2015 by Tom.
          >
          > One of the things that we often hear about WordPress is that it has a > low-barrier to entry for those who are interested in programming and/or for > those who are interested in applying what they’ve learned about computer > science or software development. Generally speaking, I have a hard time > saying that out loud. I’ll talk about this in[…] > There were 7 comments > <
          https://tommcfarlin.com/wordpress-and-developer-maturity/#comments> > previous to this. Here is this reply in context: > Ashiquzzaman Kiron < http://wpplugindirectory.org> >
          > Just out this survey >
          http://stackoverflow.com/research/developer-survey-2015#tech-super > WordPress is in number in Most dreaded list, that’s something new.
          > Tom < https://tommcfarlin.com> >
          > WordPress is in number in Most dreaded list, that’s something new.
          >
          > I think it depends on how long you’ve been around WordPress or even Stack > Overflow. Personally, I don’t find it very new mainly because I’ve always > heard developers complaining out it (even from the days when SO started).
          >
          > It’s unique, though, because it’s often compared to frameworks and > languages when, as far as I’m concerned, it’s an extensible application.
          >
          > Either way, no big deal. It is how it is and no programming community is > without it’s faults. If you look up anything about, say, PHP and “The > League” then you’ll see more of the same kind of stuff. Same goes in > looking for GitHub issues for frameworks like Angular or something similar.
          >
          > I don’t know if that justifies anything or makes it better, but it does > show that WordPress isn’t unique in that regard.
          > Andrew Fielden <
          http://andrew.ahead4.biz> >
          > Couldn’t agree with you more Tom, I particularly like the description of > WordPress as an extensible application. I have been giving this quite some > thought over the last day and would like to offer some extended suggestions.
          >
          > This is something that I have come across all the time I have been > associated with programming. Way back in the day I can remember C++ > programmers looking down on BASIC programmers who looked down on any form > of other scripting programmers.
          >
          > Roll forward 25 years and this is the same thing re-packaged, so a Java > programmer looks down on a Ruby programmer looks down on a WordPress > developer.
          >
          > Within a competitive development community an elitism builds around the > various tools that are available at the time so that the more complex and > hence more difficult skill to acquire is valued more highly.
          >
          > Ultimately though this is the perspective of a developer rather than of a > manager or an organization that wants a site or app or whatever done as > quickly and efficiently as possible for the best price. So I would suggest > that with this in mind WordPress is doing rather well and is doing so due > to it’s low barrier to entry vs the ability to create something useful.
          >
          > I do wonder though how long WordPress can continue in it’s current format.
          > You mentioned in the post the various things that a developer will need to > know to become proficient in WordPress. Since it’s birth WordPress has been > evolving alongside an online environment that has seen massive change in > the way that new things are built. As a result it feels like it may be a > bit cumbersome right now.
          >
          > I also feel that WordPress has arrived at a point where there is a > fundamental conflict in what it is trying to achieve. Is it a simple to use > and theme publishing system or is it the extensible application you > described it as?
          >
          > As I said before a business will want to get it’s online presence as > quickly and efficiently as possible. As for a business owning it’s own > site, what does that actually mean? For years now the servers your site > runs on are very unlikely to be owned by you, so what difference does it > make if the application software is not your responsibility either? In fact > it is probably a benefit, then all you are responsible for is a bit of > customization and adding content.
          >
          > This is the challenge for WordPress and I believe that some of the current > moves in the core development are as a response to the competition that > sites such as squarespace and shopify are posing.
          >
          > Unfortunately this is at odds with the extensible application paradigm.
          >
          > So here is an idea….
          >
          > WordPress is a way of doing things it is not a technology. Despite the > ideal of maintaining backwards compatibility this is not sustainable in the > long run, in fact it has effectively been abandoned since themes now have > to use the customizer otherwise they can’t be admitted, this is hardly > being backwards compatible.
          >
          > We already know that the customizer is browser oriented with javascript, > in fact it looks remarkably like the way you customize a squarespace site.
          >
          > So maybe the way for WordPress to regain some of it’s lower barrier to > entry is to do the same thing as it did years ago except this time with > Javascript as the weapon of choice talking to the REST API instead of PHP > talking to WP Query et al..
          >
          > That way a developer will be using and learning one language. A language > that he almost has to use for any sort of interactive web page anyway. If a > set of functions can be made available to the dev just like the PHP ones > then you have created a really easy to use system.
          >
          > Whilst this is not WordPress as we know it today it is a possibility that > this is on the cards anyway. In the last 6 months I have heard and seen > indications from Automattic of node.js being in the mix at some point – > this is hardly php. If this is correct then it is moving all towards a > Javascript environment.
          >
          > If this does happen then the extensible app is really on the cards since > all the extensions would be client side and you could really knock your > socks off without threat to the server and other sites hosted.
          >
          > Just a thought mind… > Reply to this email to reply to shrewsburyprop.
          > Leave this conversation >
          > To no longer receive other comments or replies in this discussion reply > with the word ‘unsubscribe’.
          >
          > Sent from Tom McFarlin <
          https://tommcfarlin.com>. Delivered by Postmatic > < https://gopostmatic.com/?utm_source=footer&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=pluginfooter>.
          >
          >

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