Support Doesn’t Scale (or “Avoid Free WordPress Support”)

Recently, I’ve been talking quite a bit about profiting from open source software, strategies for supporting WordPress plugins, and debating just how much to support to offer.

To say that I’ve been exploring business models and support offerings for my plugins would be a bit of an understatement. Clearly, this has been something that’s been on my mind for the last few months.

The thing is, this won’t be the first time that I’ve ventured into this territory. In fact, I’ve done this for two plugins – WP Social Icons and Author Admin – that I retired some time ago. Ultimately, I want to make sure that if I do this again, I do this right.

But while I’m still working on the logistics of everything, I thought it’d be worth sharing why I’m even doing this.

Quite simply: Support doesn’t scale.

TL;DR: Given that support is a function of the number of plugins offered and the number of users for each plugin, it’s clear that offering support becomes more and more time consuming with each user.

How obvious, right? Nothing groundbreaking. But that doesn’t mean that this isn’t a challenge that a number of plugin (and/or theme) developers experience on a daily basis.

My Own Experience

Currently, I offer eight plugins all of which are available in the WordPress plugin repository.

Free WordPress Support (Avoid It)
All eight of my plugins in the WordPress Plugin Repository

None of the plugins that I offer are incredibly complex and that’s by design. Much of what I’ve released has been motivated by a need that I’ve (or someone else has) had, and I firmly believe in starting lean and introducing features as the project matures.

But the complexity of a plugin doesn’t necessarily have much to do with how many times it’s downloaded, or how much support it demands. Instead, I think that it has more to do with its utility than anything else.

The problem is that in the last few months, I’ve begun to spend an increasingly significant amount of time responding to emails, blog comments, and forum posts for people that are currently using the plugins.

It’s Not a Lack of Appreciation

Ask anyone who builds software for a living: One of the most rewarding aspects of the career is hearing from those who use (and perhaps abuse) your work.

Sure, you may get some negative criticism, but the majority of the feedback that I receive are from people who:

  • Enjoy the plugin, but can’t get it to work with their theme or set of existing plugins
  • Want to further customize it for their own needs
  • Ask about adding additional features

None of this is to say that I – or other developers – don’t appreciate our users (because we do!). But at some point, we have to draw a line for how far we’re willing to work for free.

Avoid Free WordPress Support

Sure, this is a bit of hyperbole, but the truth is that in almost no other industry will you find a parallel of someone releasing a product and then offering to support it completely free of charge.

It doesn’t matter if you go into a big box retailer, or chat with someone on the phone, everyone is being compensated for their time, and just because a project is made freely available, doesn’t mean that everything that comes with it should also be free.

Yes, I think there are certain expectations for WordPress plugins. They should:

  • Be written using the WordPress API
  • Follow coding conventions
  • Avoid providing too much styling so as not to interfere with existing presentation

And I think that developers have some obligation to at least investigate each claim that something isn’t working right, though I question almost anything beyond that.

Moving To Premium Support

All that to say that I’ve gone from charging for support of my work, to supporting each of my plugins for free, and now I’m looking to move back to charging for support.

Perhaps I’ve learned it the hard way.

Regardless, the point of sharing all of this is not only to continue the discussion, but also to begin documenting the [slow] process of moving back to charging for support and all that it entails.

39 Replies to “Support Doesn’t Scale (or “Avoid Free WordPress Support”)”

  1. Nice article! I think we all learn the hard way. We want to be “nice” and help others, but people tend to take advantage of our time and don’t realize that it is our livelihood. You wouldn’t ask a doctor to perform a free surgery, or a mechanic perform a free tune up, then why ask us for a free debugging session and feature request?

    It is a slippery slope… I have provided free support to products I have written in the past, which led to a good working relationship, name recognition and additional jobs. However, there was this one client… (most business tragedies start this way), and they wanted new functionality, they upgraded something that didn’t work and blamed my tool for not working.

    My rules are:
    1) First 3 support calls are free – bug fixes, configuration issues, and installation problems only (my discretion)
    2) All additional requests are billable at the standard support rate.
    3) All feature requests are billable at the standard development rate.

    Most appreciate the free 3 calls as a compromise, they understand that time is valuable. All in all, it has worked well in the past for me.

    Final note on this: Never bend on those rules. Friends and family included. Your time is your time, it is very important because everyone would soon fall into the “friend” category and you will be spending all of your time fixing things for free and losing paying clients because of it.

    1. My rules are:
      1) First 3 support calls are free – bug fixes, configuration issues, and installation problems only (my discretion)
      2) All additional requests are billable at the standard support rate.
      3) All feature requests are billable at the standard development rate

      Glad to hear this worked out. In the direction that I’m planning to go, I’m probably going to be a bit more strict – half of the reason that I’m going to go back to the premium model is because of the demands on my time, and the other half has to do with dissuading those who usually harp on support requests from doing just that.

      It’s not just about boundaries, though. I believe that if you sell a product, you’re obligated to provide a support service (well, in some industries) and that support should have the same quality that you believe to have been built into the product.

      Plugins will provide value, but if a user needs additional help, then support is what should provide the next level of tailored value for them.

  2. Completely agree with everything you said. You should definitely charge. It’s good to do things free once in a while but when it starts to take up too much of your time, it becomes more stressful then joyful.

    Also, when you start to do things for free, and then charge, people have a hard time with that transition. Be weary of that especially since your going back to charging.

    In the end, time is money, I think everyone can relate to that. Do what you gotta do man, I fully support it!

    1. It’s good to do things free once in a while but when it starts to take up too much of your time, it becomes more stressful then joyful.

      Yep, and I also want to make sure that I’m providing as much quality support as possible. It gets hard to do that when your inbox is inundated with questions, comments, feature requests, potential bugs, etc.

      I need a better system for doing that, so going the premium support route will hopefully be key in that.

      Thanks for the comment, Jonathan!

  3. I’ve been contemplating offering plugins on WordPress.org that are not client plugins but my biggest concern is the need for support. The problem is if you don’t support your plugins (for free) you can get bad ratings. So it’s a catch 22.

    Currently WordPress.org promotes the concept of GPL and probably without intention the need to offer free support. One huge improvement would be if plugins could be listed as offering free or paid support and then only those paying for paid support could rate paid-support plugins. That would create a real economy around plugin support and provide revenue streams for plugin developers as well as transactional revenue for WordPress.org but I would be shocked to ever see that happen.

    Unless and until that happens the burden of publishing a plugin on WordPress.org is the need to endure providing free support w/o much means generate income from doing so, unless you sell a premium version, but then the cost of support becomes a marketing expense and not a cost of goods sold meaning support can still be a huge drain.

    I would definitely publish more plugins on WordPress.org if requiring support for plugins be paid w/o incurring the downside of potentially negative ratings.

    1. That’s a really interesting idea, but I think you’re right that it wouldn’t fly. I think the main criticism of it would be about restricting reviews to paid users. I wonder if there are other ways that the .org repo can help developers offer premium support, though, without restricting user’s current abilities?

      I think it’d be huge if the repo would give us some tools to help manage user’s expectations and education them about how much work it takes to create, maintain and support open source plugins.

      Right now so many users just feel entitled to free plugins, free support and free features requests. If we can change that culture, then it’ll be a much better environment for developers, but it’s gonna be hard to do from the bottom-up.

      I loved Alex King’s idea with the WordPress Help Center, but unfortunately it wasn’t able to survive (http://alexking.org/blog/2011/01/25/helpcenter-shutting-down).

      1. I don’t know what the answer is but I do know that the current repository setup is effectively designed to penalize the plugin developer who publishes a successful plugin; the more successful the more they are penalized with need for support. That’s why I’ve not published any significant plugins to speak of; I fear getting overwhelmed with “fix my site” support requests from people who will be indignant if I don’t help them and rate the plugin poorly.

        As for restricting user’s current abilities, is the expectation of free support something you would consider a “current ability?” And if so do you think it’s sustainable current ability, at least on a per-plugin basis? I guess many people would feel annoyed that it wouldn’t be as easy for them to impose on another person’s time, but is fair or realistic to expect status quo without continued plugin abandonment or continued mediocre quality plugins in most cases?

        I do agree that there’s no way it will change without leadership from WordPress.org, and my guess is that the it’s not a pain they feel (it has been almost 10 years…) so I doubt anything will change even though it’s possible that making changes could improve the quality of available plugins for everyone involved. I hope I’m wrong.

        1. What I meant by the “current abilities” is the ability to rate plugins. If I understand what you wrote correctly, it sounds like you’re saying that plugins that offered paid support could only be rated by users who purchased support. I think that would draw a lot of criticism because it seems to be an artificial restriction; whether or not somebody purchases support doesn’t have a direct bearing on whether or not their rating is valid.

          I definitely understand your concern about rude users punishing a plugin with a unjustified negative rating because they’re offended that their demands weren’t met, but I don’t think restricting who can and can’t rate based on purchasing support is the best solution to that problem, because it has the unintended consequence of blocking legitimate reviews just because they didn’t purchase support.

          1. I see the point you were trying to make now. But I’m not sure I agree with the premise that support doesn’t have a direct bearing in many cases on someone’s perception of a plugin. Take WP Total Cache for example. I’ve been told its a great plugin but it has an overwhelming number of options and w/o support I can see people being unhappy with it because they don’t know how to configure it. Of course it does have a 4.5 star average rating so maybe my point if not valid, but there are 230 1 star ratings and there are 108 pages of support requests and I don’t know how much free support was given.

            On the other hand I do agree that there might be a lot of criticism, but some of the best decisions in history were met with lots of criticism so I’m not sure it’s fair to say that lack of criticism of a potential action determines the potential action’s validity, don’t you think?

            I also don’t know if my strawman proposal is the best idea, it was just something I threw out to start discussion. WordPress does a tremendous job for those who have more time than money. However WordPress often chooses paths that minimize the value that could be created by the support of those with more money than time or those who would like to contribute but need to be able to make a viable living when they do so. Why do almost no major software vendors provide tools for WordPress? Probably because there’s no way they’ve seen to make it a viable business model.

            If the policies encouraged GPL software but paid support I think everyone would win; those with less money than time would get access to great software for free, and those with more money than time could be assured of the support they need and minimize the chance a plugin they depend on will get orphaned. And I believe that would result in a lot higher quality software available for everyone whether they pay for support or not. OTOH I don’t for a minute think it’s likely to change on WordPress.org so I do admit this discussion is pretty much moot.

            That said, if you don’t think that limiting rating to those who purchase support is a good solution, what’s your alternate proposal?

          2. I see your points too, and don’t have any significant disagreements with them. I totally agree about the time/money imbalance, and that the ecosystem would be much better if we found a way to stay true to the GPL while also supporting dev’s who offer premium services. I don’t think there’s any inherit conflict between the two, so it’s mostly a matter changing the expectations that currently exists.

            I don’t claim to have any solutions, but I think at least two things need to happen, and they’ll probably require some significant support from the community leads to make it happen.

            1) Educate users that they shouldn’t expect to get everything for free.

            I don’t have any good ideas for how this could be done from the top-down right now, but I’m sure there are some good ones. What do you think?

            One thing we can do from the bottom-up, though, is to give short ignite-style presentations at meetups and WordCamps to let users know how much work it takes to give away free software, and explain that we need to put food on our tables too. Seeing a developer say those things face to face could have a big impact on users who normally don’t have to think about it.

            2) Provide consistent ways to present premium options to users.

            One idea would be to add extra plugin headers for “Premium Support” and “Premium Features”, in addition to the existing Donate header. That would help funnel users who wanted premium services to a place where they’re provided.

            Devs could set those headers to arbitrary URLs where they host their own support forums and sell the premium version of the plugin. Then, the plugin’s page on the .org repo could change the .org forums link text from “Support” to “Community Support”, and add a new link for “Premium Support”. The repo page would also add a link in the top menu or sidebar to the premium marketplace.

            Since it would appear the same for every plugin, it’d also help get users used to seeing premium options, and that would help change the “everything is free” expectation.

          3. “Educate users that they shouldn’t expect to get everything for free.”

            I don’t think education of the masses is ever a solution, unless you are maybe discussing funding of a country’s education system. I’ve heard education suggested for so many similar issues but when has education ever improved on a situation like this? You may reach 2% of users at WordCamps, or 10% if you are lucky, and then somewhere between 2% to 10% of those users actually pay attention and act on the education; everyone else will behave the way they have always behaved, especially when they feel they need something a plugin might provide them.

            Unless there is a mechanism that forces people to change their behavior they won’t change their behavior. The change to require a written review was actually a good one in that it eliminated the ability to give a 1 star rating with only 1 click, but it doesn’t stop people who just need support from rating a plugin poorly. (BTW, didn’t the requirement to write a review “take away a capability” that users previously had? That just occurred to me.)

            One idea would be to add extra plugin headers for “Premium Support” and “Premium Features”, in addition to the existing Donate header.

            Yes, that would have more positive results than education. And it would be a step in the right direction, but it wouldn’t help the poor ratings concern. Also, having the Community Support area still puts a burden on the developer to provide support there as it’s hard to ignore complaints and see the support queue fill up with questions from people not willing to pay for support. Better for the developer to route all support to the developer’s premium support forum, but I can’t see WordPress.org ever doing that.

          4. I agree that any kind of education would have to be backed up with concrete actions, but I wouldn’t dismiss education out of hand. I’m not saying that meetup/WordCamp presentations are the silver bullet, just that they’re one part of the solution. Changing a culture takes time and many different simultaneous approaches, but it can be done.

            Requiring a review in order to rate a plugin did restrict users’ abilities, in a sense, but the difference is that it was done based on whether or not the user was willing to back up their rating with a written justification, not on the basis of money. I don’t think many in the OS community would object to denying lazy people anything, but you’ll get a lot of pushback when you start to require people to buy things in order to participate.

            I don’t see WP.org ever forcing users to use premium support either, and I don’t think they should. I think there should be free options, I just think that WP.org should help support the premium plugin ecosystem, like they’ve done with the premium theme ecosystem. (Right now, for instance, there’s a link to a premium theme marketplace on the WP.org home page, because they switched to being 100% GPL; and commercial themes are linked to from the WP.org theme repository sidebar)

            Most users will never pay for premium support anyway, so splitting the forums between free/community and paid/premium basically acts as a filter. The users who want/need premium support will go to the premium forum because they have money but not time, and the rest can be taken care of (or not) by the community. If they can’t get help from the community and are unwilling to pay for it, then they’re out of luck.

            I agree that this doesn’t solve the negative rating problem, but that wasn’t really my goal. I do think it’s a problem, but it’s not the biggest priority for me personally. When it’s happened to me I just try to write a thoughtful response (more for the benefit of other users than the actual reviewer), and then shrug it off. The vast majority of ratings are still 4 or 5 stars, so it doesn’t bother me if a handful are 1 or 2. You’ll see the same dynamic on Amazon or other places. I think most users realize that even the best products get negative reviews from the segment of the populations that’s impossible to please.

          5. Ian – Given you most recent comments your points are valid and I thinkl we pretty much agree in concept.

            The one thing where we still differ is our relative concerns for the potential of negative ratings. It really bothers me in part because I would view a 1 to 3 stars as a failure and since I’m in the business of building plugins for clients it looks bad if prospects see plugins I’ve built with poor ratings. Thus it keeps me from releasing plugins I otherwise would release.

            You can see that we started releasing a lot of software lately on our GitHub account because there we don’t have to worry about a rating system that others can take advantage of.

            I don’t know how unique I am but I would guess there are a lot more people like me who would release good plugins if they knew that ratings would not take a hit because of lack of free support and if WordPress.org encouraged a viable method of them getting paid for support.

          6. I’m wondering if we can learn any lessons from other systems here. For instance, I was just looking up a restaurant’s website, and they had a widget that said, “We have 252 5-star reviews on Yelp” along with a 5-star graphic and a link to their Yelp page.

            So, instead of displaying the average rating (which can be affected by invalid negative reviews), they only display the number of positive reviews. Then the viewer can dig deeper into the reviews if they want a more nuanced assessment.

            It’d be trivial to modify the I Make Plugins plugin to display the number of 4 and 5 star reviews, so that you could put that on your website for clients to see.

        2. I fear getting overwhelmed with “fix my site” support requests from people who will be indignant if I don’t help them and rate the plugin poorly.

          A valid fear, for sure. This will happen.

          Another problem is that people:

          See their issues as minor one off issues that couldn’t possibly inconvenience the developer
          Don’t truly grok just how many users may be reaching out to the developer behind the plugin.

          It’s an honest perspective, but that doesn’t change the fact that the developer feels the pain.

      2. I think it’d be huge if the repo would give us some tools to help manage user’s expectations and education them about how much work it takes to create, maintain and support open source plugins.

        I disagree that we need to educate users how much work goes into creating plugins – no other industry does this, you know?

        No one knows how much goes into creating a software application, a computer, a guitar, a piano, a car, a building, etc. We generally have fair market values or suggested retail prices to set our expectations.

        I think that’s something that would be something more helpful than having people see how much time and effort we put into our work.

        But that feeds directly into your next point:

        Right now so many users just feel entitled to free plugins, free support and free features requests. If we can change that culture, then it’ll be a much better environment for developers, but it’s gonna be hard to do from the bottom-up.

        Exactly this. It’s an entitlement issue, though I don’t fault the users for this – I fault the system that was put in place years ago. It’s bred this particular mentality that is a natural by product, so what else can we expect?

        I don’t know if changing it from the bottom-up is harder, or if changing it from the top-down is harder, but – to use a cliche – I do feel as if we’re caught in a bit of a rock and a hard place.

        I just want to try to wiggle my way back out of it a little bit :).

    2. I’ve been contemplating offering plugins on WordPress.org that are not client plugins but my biggest concern is the need for support. The problem is if you don’t support your plugins (for free) you can get bad ratings. So it’s a catch 22.

      Not only that, the repository gives you a wide area of exposure from those who knows how to search from within the WordPress Dashboard.

      So you get this high visibility, but if you cripple the plugin or prompt people to pay for premium support, you end up getting – like you mentioned – negative feedback, so it’s almost like 1.5( catch-22 ); :).

      I’ve heard from other developers who have published to the repository and just introduced a sticky post that mentioned the plugin wasn’t supported by the free forums.

      But, again, back to the negative ratings. I like the rating system, but people’s motivations for rating the plugin on its value – it’s based on if they receive support.

      That’s a problem.

      1. Tom, I think we are completely in-sync here.

        Many will probably say that encouraging free support and free ratings is the best for the community but I think that does not acknowledge the very real aspects of game theory. People who are more highly skilled and thus capable of building better plugins are dis-incented from doing so which results in most of the plugins in repository (but not all, of course) being poor quality and having poor support.

        I’m all for GPL software, I currently publish everything I can as open-soruce and I really appreciate when something is available for free I can use it in my own GPL projects, but the quality of GPL plugins available would go up if WordPress.org encouraged a way for people who develop plugins to make a living for those things that are not freely copyable like as a person’s time.

        1. Agreed on all fronts.

          I love open-source software and have been using it since I was in school (at that time, I was a full on Linux nerd ;), but I appreciate what WordPress is and the licensing under which it falls.

          I have absolutely no problem providing the source code for the work of my plugin that extends the core, but it’s simply trying to provide a quality product and a quality service to match.

          But you hit the nail on the head: The incentive for the users to rate the plugins is misplaced, and the developer’s incentive to release quality products is too low.

          On top of that, I’d venture to say that the sheer openness of the plugin repository allows people who really need to sharpen their skills before shipping something to such a large audience, thus we’d avoid such a wide array of plugin conflicts, but that’s an entire other issue.

          I do like that the current moderators are being more hardcore about following best practices before letting plugins in, but there’s still tens of thousands in there.

          I don’t wanna say it’s too little too late, but it’s certainly more than an uphill battle.

  4. I have been offering free support for my plugins as well and it has been increasing. Totally agree this should not be the norm. I wish WordPress.org had a way to post a support policy.

    I’ve started to reply with a general self help reply and then say if you need more assistance please upgrade. I have not yet started to measure what the conversion rate is for these links but plan to.

      1. This is something but I’m really hesitant to begin doing this.

        The reason being that I know people who offer premium versions of their plugin that have done this and it has done nothing to curtail the negative feedback, one star rating, and overall entitlement mentality that comes with free software.

    1. I fear getting overwhelmed with “fix my site” support requests from people who will be indignant if I don’t help them and rate the plugin poorly.

      I’ve seen some developers do this using a sticky post in the support forums.

      This doesn’t prevent negative rating, but it is one way to help drive traffic to the premium support site, but I think it’s a fair step.

  5. The support issue is definitely something that makes me to hesitate to publish plugins to the directory. It’s not just that it doesn’t scale financially, it’s also about assuming a greater responsibility the more a plugin becomes popular. Often the burden of that isn’t outweighed by the benefits.

    There’s also an issue with the nature of support requests. Some are important in terms of fixing bugs and making the plugin better and others are more about bending backwards to help someone on their way with their site. It’s fun to help some people out like this, but it quickly drains resources once you get too many requests.

    I’m surprised there aren’t more commercial WP businesses that organize support around plugins and themes created by other developers. That would be pretty attractive from a plugin author’s perspective (well it would mine at least).

      1. I’m sorry that I didn’t know about WPHC before until now. I’m even more sorry to see that they had to shut down. There are also some interesting insights in the comments to that post.

        I can see a business potential here for a company that already provides premium support and have all the infrastructure and staff in place.

        I’d love to be able to direct all support questions to someone who can help them in a timely and professional manner – even if they have to pay for it. Which I think they should.

    1. There’s also an issue with the nature of support requests. Some are important in terms of fixing bugs and making the plugin better and others are more about bending backwards to help someone on their way with their site. It’s fun to help some people out like this, but it quickly drains resources once you get too many requests.

      This is where some type of tiered pricing structure would probably fit in – bug reports, feature requests, tailored solutions, or something like that.

      This is all still stuff I’m considering and working out, but I’m right on track with what you’re saying.

      To be honest, I’ve seen some developers do a killer job of offering support and making a living off of it, but they usually roll their own systems or leverage an existing marketplace to help drive traffic (like CodeCanyon).

      I’m personally not interested in going that route, but I’ve seen it done.

  6. Hi,

    Great article indeed.

    Initially, I encouraged people to send me emails … I even included my phone numbers (not cell of course). … but that wasn’t a cool idea.

    Now, I am moving to a community support for my free plugins and premium support for my paid plugins. I am setting up a membership site.

    Donation model is totally not a good business model. We must charge for support or access to better plugins so we can keep improving them otherwise we’ll have to take on another projects which delays the plugin release cycles.

    I am looking at S2Member plugin. They release updates almost every day. Good for them.

    Slavi
    http://club.orbisius.com

    1. Initially, I encouraged people to send me emails … I even included my phone numbers (not cell of course). … but that wasn’t a cool idea.

      You’re a brave man giving out your phone number!

      The donation model doesn’t work at all. It seems as if when people have no incentive to give for a product like this – and it is a product – they simply don’t.

  7. At one point, I’m fairly sure I was providing more support for my plugin(s) than anyone else out there. Eventually the burden became to great and I moved to free support with paid upgrade support for more complex stuff. Then that became to burdensome and I ditched free support altogether. Then the paid support became to burdensome, so I dropped that too. Now I do bug fixing whenever someone reports a genuine bug. Otherwise I provide minimal support. It’s just not possible for me to find the time otherwise.

    1. Then the paid support became to burdensome, so I dropped that too.

      This surprises me – I’d assume that if it were that burdensome you’d be able to hire some help (unless the price point wasn’t that great).

      Mind sharing your story? I’m all ears as I’m trying to avoid this myself :).

  8. It would be interesting to see more mechanism on wp.org that can lead to rewarding developers. I don’t see why there can’t be tighter flattr/paypal/bitcoin integration for example. If other users see that people are tipping developers for providing support and by having a more public, visual way to see users contributing back to developers, it will become more normative for general users to expect to contribute something back.

    More visual cues would be important too, having some stats stating how many development hours a plugin has costed so far, how many users have made contributions either through code contributions, promoting the plugin (reviews/likes), donations and tips. As someone looking for reliability indicators when picking a plugin, seeing that users are contributing back is a really good signal that the plugin is worth installing.

    Also, if there’s a bit of stat tracking for users on the forums, when deciding to which degree to provide a user with support developers could factor in a user’s track record (i.e. you might deprioritise a chronic freetard (term coined by Aaron Wall I believe), or be more than happy to help out someone who’s made contributions in the past).

    1. chronic freetard

      LOL! You had me rolling…

      But your comment showcases a great idea; if there were integration to donations and total donations where made visible from support requests then in part it could potentially “gamify” providing donations or at least offer peer-pressure.

      If something like that were in place, with a reasonable percentage going to the WordPress Foundation (15%?) and a factor based on their person’s home country (, i.e. one US$ donation from someone in the Conga, Liberia or Zimbabwe should count for a lot more than one US$ from someone in the USA where I live) then I bet we’d see donations increase 10 fold if not 100 fold.

      Something to chew on…

      1. It’s definitely got me thinking in terms of what Cialdini and Dan Ariely would advise if they were hired as consultants to wp.org. Creating a shift in habits for contributing back to developers/designers would be great for the ecosystem.

        You make a good point about taking into account the value of the dollar in the native country. That also reminds me of the recent story about how the S.African government paid millions for a WordPress theme, now that’s getting paid.

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