Adding WordPress Modal Dialogs (Using Static Data) Let's continue to look at WordPress modal dialogs and built-in libraries using static data.

In the previous post, I walked through the process required to get WordPress modal dialogs to appear within the context of the administration area.

This uses:

* the built-in WordPress API,
* the provided Thickbox library,
* and some example code for getting it to display.

In this tutorial, I'll walk through populating the modal dialog with data. After that, I'll share how to populate the data dynamically using Ajax . . .

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Adding WordPress Modal Dialogs (With Built in Libraries) Let's talk about easily incorporating WordPress modal dialogs with built-in libraries.

Whenever it comes to developing solutions for clients, there are going to be times when you're likely tasked with displaying information in WordPress modal dialogs.

But WordPress has infrastructure built-in that makes it trivial to incorporate functionality into WordPress. So in three upcoming posts, I'll cover the following:

* How to incorporate WordPress modal dialogs using built-in libraries,
* Populating the modal dialogs with data,
* Populating the modal dialog with dynamic data via Ajax . . .

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Thanks for your interest in this article! Note that it's available to members only. If you'd like to review this (and have access to all previous and future articles), check out the membership benefits.