WordPress Plugin Boilerplate

Information, updates, and other posts related to my WordPress Plugin Boilerplate that serves to provide a solid foundation for building WordPress plugins.

WordPress Plugin Boilerplate: Testing 1, 2, 3

In 2011, I released the first version of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate and have been maintaining it (along with contributions from other programmers) ever since.

Over the last couple of years, the Boilerplate became quite active – as far as very small projects are concerned – with issues, pull requests, and so on. It’s been a lot of fun to maintain, and it’s been really neat to receive so much feedback from other developers in terms of making the Boilerplate more resilient and from those who were just getting started with plugin development.

Earlier this year, I shared that I – along with a small group of other people – began working on the next iteration of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate. That is, we were initiating a complete rewrite of the project.

As of today, I’m officially launching a beta of sorts of 3.0.0 of the Boilerplate. This is a major rewrite and refactoring of the Boilerplate in the state that its had for the past few years, and there’s a lot of change coming not only to the Boilerplate itself, but to new site, documentation, forks, and so on.

Educate Your Users in Open Source Software

One of the things that I’m working hard to have released by the end of the month is the latest version of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate.

The latest version has been in development for quite a while now (a lot has happened offline so, you know, that’s how it goes).

The last time that I really spent any time talking about this project was in November 2013. A lot has changed since then. Initially, I was planning on a minor upgrade with some of the following features:

  • Releasing the version has part of the 2.x.x versioning
  • Including a class specifically for administrative functionality
  • Fixing issues with symbolic links and textdomains
  • Including more TODO’s for users to find what needs to be changed
  • …and so on.

But when I got started on the next version of the Boilerplate, a lot of things changed. The short of it is that it’s being completely re-written from the ground up and the code and documentation are being split into to separate things for the sake of user education.

I’ll spend more time talking about the Boilerplate in a future, but one of the things that I wanted to share that’s related to running a project like the Boilerplate has to do with open source, contributions, lack of a vision, and how this can negatively impact your project and your users.

The Logo for the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate

As discussed earlier last month, the next version of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate is currently in development.

For those who are interested:

  • You can find the current stable version on GitHub.
  • The develop branch to which the core team and I are working (though we’re not currently accepting pull requests).
  • And you can read about the changes in the upcoming version in this previous post.

The foundation of the status of the next version of the Boilerplate currently leaves a lot to be desired, but the team and I – along with the help of Slack (probably a topic for another post ) – are in the process of planning the upcoming website that will accompany the project.

Slack - WordPress Plugin Boilerplate

The problem? We’re all developers, but we need a logo.

How We’re Planning The Next Iteration of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate

Months ago, I announced that there was going to be a major update to the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate.

Because of its nature in being a hobby project, because this project is something that’s being worked on by a number of contributors, and because the next iteration is going to be a major rewrite of what we have so far, it’s taking a while to begin pushing code for the new Boilerplate.

But there are a lot of neat things coming, and I think that even if it’s taking us a while to get something on GitHub, it’s worth providing updates as to where we currently stand with the project.

The Latest Branch of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate

Just shy of a month ago, I shared some information about the state of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate.

Specifically, I mentioned the following:

  • We’re working on rewriting it to be cleaner, easier to understand, and more flexible for developers of all experience.
  • I’ve got a small, core team of volunteers helping me out (who I greatly appreciate).
  • Where we’re headed with this latest version of the project.

To be honest, I’ve never been more excited about the project.

There’s a lot more coming down the pipeline that I’ll cover later in this post – I also want to clear up some fun versioning quirks that I’ve been asked about – but I wanted to give a heads up on the current state of the codebase and where you can follow along with the development as we begin to push code.

The State of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate

One of the projects that I love working on the most is the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate.

I dig it because it’s been a resource that has helped other people, and there are a number of other contributors that are constantly working to make it even better.

Earlier this year, I had plans to begin releasing more frequent updates, but – as with the nature of employment and side projects that are done for free – the updates didn’t happen as fast as I would like.

Additionally, it was becoming clear to me that the Boilerplate was headed in a direction that was going to be more intimidating for beginners, harder to grasp for those migrating their plugins to that format, and that it was not using some of the best principles in place.

So after talking with a number of notable developers, I’ve opted to delay the release of 2.7.0 until we have something significantly better than what’s in place.

In fact, it’s going to be a near total rewrite.

The WordPress Plugin Boilerplate 2.6.1 is Now Available

For those who are interested in following future development, sign up for the mailing list!

The next version of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate is officially tagged and available for download in GitHub.

This release – although a minor improvement over the last – introduces several improvements to 2.6.0, and also marks a change in the development of the project, as well as the introduction of several things that will be coming to the Boilerplate in the next several versions.

Subscribe For Updates: The WordPress Plugin Boilerplate

With yesterday’s announcement of the latest release of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate, I’ve had a number of emails, tweets, and messages how people can stay up to date with the project without having to follow the GitHub repository, or the blog.

Ultimately, I want to make sure that this Boilerplate reaches the largest number of developers both for those who wish to contribute, and for those who wish to use it as a starting place for their projects.

As such, I’ve created an opt-in mailing list to which you can subscribe.

The WordPress Plugin Boilerplate 2.6.0 is Now Available

For those who are interested in following future development, sign up for the mailing list!

Today, I am absolutely stoked to announce the next major release of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate.

I discussed some of the things I’ve learned – and some of the changes that have been implemented in a recent post – but I couldn’t be happier with this release.

Some quick statistics:

  • The last official release was on May 17, 2013. We had one minor release in July that I opted to fold into this release and officially tag as 2.6.0.
  • We’re now working to implement semantic versioning into the Boilerplate.
  • The milestone for 2.7.0 is already being planned.
  • The project now includes 241 commits and 10 contributors

This is by far the largest commit and set of changes that have gone into the Boilerplate since it has been released. You can grab it here, but read on for more details!

Preparing For The WordPress Plugin Boilerplate 2.6.0

The WordPress Plugin Boilerplate has been a bit of a pet project of mine a little over the past two years.

In that time, it’s grown from something that I was using to jumpstart my own plugin development efforts into a more mature boilerplate that provides a significant number of features specifically to help developers get started with best practices in developing WordPress plugins.

However, that maturity has happened not because I’m the one who has been constantly contributing to the project, but because it has received so many awesome pull requests and discussions from others.

And with my getting ready to release 2.6.0 of the Boilerplate, I’m looking for one final push!