Considerations for Design Patterns for WordPress Maybe there are certain Design Patterns for WordPress. In this post and an upcoming series, perhaps it's worth exploring them.

The longer you work with a given platform, the more you begin to recognize certain ways to do something. And it’s very likely that you’ll begin to recognize two things these things can be done:

  • in a way that’s fast to develop, but harder to maintain or
  • in a way that’s slower to develop, but easier to maintain.

Of course, like any project, requirements, constraints, budgets, and time are all going to impact what you’re able to implement. But what I’m getting at is that regardless of how you implement a solution, you begin to get familiar for how to solve a given problem.

If a problem has to be solved quickly, then you know the tradeoffs, but you likely know how to do it quickly. Similarly, if you have a little more time (and budget), you can develop it another way, and you’ll know how to do it and possibly even wrap it up with test suites if the constraints allow for that.

Regardless of how you have to implement a solution, you know the ways that you can do it.

And this raises a question:

Are there design patterns specific to a given platform? And if so, what are some of the design patterns that may be available in WordPress?

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