Projects

Posts introducing, updating, and covering various projects to which I’ve contributed or that I maintain.

Easier Dev Practices For Everyone

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I don’t talk about this much on this particular blog because it’s outside the scope of the usual content on which I try to focus, but whenever there’s something worth mentioning, I bring it up.

As such, almost a year ago, I started Dev Practices. In fact, I have a very short post introducing the site on September 16th, 2013.

I still stand by what I said in the first post:

There are two absolutely amazing things that the Internet has brought us:

1. Animated GIFs

2. Memes

And when you combine the two together, you get some seriously good stuff, right?

When I set out to create the site, I didn’t really think of it as anything else that a dumb way to have some fun for a little while.

But it grew into a just a little bit more than that.

In fact, I’ve even considered porting it to WordPress and adding a lot of new features around it. Maybe eventually, but the honest truth is that it’s just a fun site, and there are so many other things that have priority.

So I’ve tried to compromise and improve just one part of the process. For now.

The WordPress Plugin Boilerplate 3.0.0

A few years ago, I started the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate project as nothing more than a GitHub repository used to store code that I found myself frequently using in both personal and client projects.

As I became more involved with WordPress, as I began to build more plugins for fun and profit, and as I began updating the repository, it grew into something a little more than I had expected.

Over time, people began to open issues, offer pull requests, perform code reviews, and create their own forks of the project. I learned a lot over the next few years, and I honestly couldn’t be more excited to see such a little project become, you know, such a slightly less little project.

Months ago, I mentioned that work on the next iteration of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate was started and I’m excited to announce that, as of today, the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate 3.0.0 is officially ready for use.

And it comes with a lot of new and neat things to boot.

WordPress Plugin Boilerplate: Testing 1, 2, 3

In 2011, I released the first version of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate and have been maintaining it (along with contributions from other programmers) ever since.

Over the last couple of years, the Boilerplate became quite active – as far as very small projects are concerned – with issues, pull requests, and so on. It’s been a lot of fun to maintain, and it’s been really neat to receive so much feedback from other developers in terms of making the Boilerplate more resilient and from those who were just getting started with plugin development.

Earlier this year, I shared that I – along with a small group of other people – began working on the next iteration of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate. That is, we were initiating a complete rewrite of the project.

As of today, I’m officially launching a beta of sorts of 3.0.0 of the Boilerplate. This is a major rewrite and refactoring of the Boilerplate in the state that its had for the past few years, and there’s a lot of change coming not only to the Boilerplate itself, but to new site, documentation, forks, and so on.

Educate Your Users in Open Source Software

One of the things that I’m working hard to have released by the end of the month is the latest version of the WordPress Plugin Boilerplate.

The latest version has been in development for quite a while now (a lot has happened offline so, you know, that’s how it goes).

The last time that I really spent any time talking about this project was in November 2013. A lot has changed since then. Initially, I was planning on a minor upgrade with some of the following features:

  • Releasing the version has part of the 2.x.x versioning
  • Including a class specifically for administrative functionality
  • Fixing issues with symbolic links and textdomains
  • Including more TODO’s for users to find what needs to be changed
  • …and so on.

But when I got started on the next version of the Boilerplate, a lot of things changed. The short of it is that it’s being completely re-written from the ground up and the code and documentation are being split into to separate things for the sake of user education.

I’ll spend more time talking about the Boilerplate in a future, but one of the things that I wanted to share that’s related to running a project like the Boilerplate has to do with open source, contributions, lack of a vision, and how this can negatively impact your project and your users.

A Plugin to Remove WordPress Pingbacks

As I mentioned in yesterday’s post, I’m going to be turning off pingbacks for the public-facing side of this blog for a number of reasons the least of which is not to help make it easier for others to participate in comments.

In order to do that, I’ve written a small plugin that helps makes this really easy to do:

  1. Download the plugin
  2. Install and activate it
  3. And you’ll be good to go

Sound simple, right? Here’s more information.

An Image Widget for WordPress

One of the best parts about being someone who uses WordPress on a daily basis both for personal use and in doing work for others is the ability to create solutions to problems that you encounter throughout your day-to-day.

Obviously, some problems are more complex than others and require more elaborate solutions, whereas others are easier problems that still may call for a simpler solution, but a solution nonetheless.

Case in point: In a few recent projects, I’ve needed to integrate an image widget that allows users to easily upload images into sidebars and/or widgetized areas of their blog. The challenge, however, is that there are multiple ways to go about doing this.

So my first take at implementing a solution for this particular problem comes in the form of the Pressware Image Widget for WordPress.

Mayer for WordPress Is on Sale

Comments are closed on this post. If you have questions or comments, leave them at The Pressware Shop.

For those of you celebrating the 4th of July here in the United States and over the course of the weekend, I hope that you have a great time. For those of you who are elsewhere, I still hope you have a great time and find something to celebrate even if it’s just the fact that it’s the weekend :).

As with most other WordPress companies, I’m offering up a 4th of July holiday sale on Mayer for WordPress over at The Pressware Shop.

Three Thoughts About Marketing WordPress.com Themes

For the last few months now, I’ve been selling Mayer exclusively on WordPress.com and I’ve really enjoyed it.

The thing is, for those that have kept up with the work I’ve been doing with WordPress over the past few years, you know that I’ve been involved in the development of several different themes (and still am, but more on that later).

The Mayer Demo on WordPress.com

The Mayer Demo on WordPress.com

But in working exclusively with the marketplace, there have been a number of questions that I’ve been thinking about as it relates to marketing WordPress.com themes.

Generally speaking, I don’t have answers to these, though I’m happy to share my thoughts; however, I’m definitely interested in hearing your thoughts and opinions as well.

The Pressware Pipeline

Recently, I’ve been asked when I’m planning to bring Mayer to self-hosted WordPress installations.

The short answer is that I don’t have a definitive answer, but I am working on the Pressware shop. The longer answer has more to do with my current backlog of work and the things that I’m trying to accomplish before doing so – that is, it has a lot to do with what’s happening within the Pressware pipeline.

To that end, I thought it might be worth sharing the current plans I have for Mayer, the eCommerce gateway I’m working to setup for Pressware as well as my current theme backlog.

Looking at the Next Version of Dev Practices

For a little over half a year now, I’ve been running (or simply managing, at times) a Tumblr blog called Dev Practices. The whole idea behind the blog is simply this:

A day in the life of a developer as illustrated by GIFs.

But I’ve been surprised. The site’s been a lot of fun to manage, people have been contributing to it, and there’s a backlog of at least a month’s worth of content.

So, like any developer at this point, I’ve started thinking about Dev Practices 2.0 (of course, I should probably come up with a better than than name, right?)